Anger and Fear

Anger makes you do the things you do,
it moves your mouth to speak as you do,
it runs like thin wires of electricity through
your limbs, branding you with its heat.

Anger and fear are Siamese twins
bound together by unholy flesh,
but don’t be afraid — you aren’t the only one.

I know they told you that you were alone,
I know that’s what makes you so afraid.
They controlled you that way
when you were small and lonely.

Fear and anger feed off each other
like cannibal crows tearing each other to bits,
but don’t be afraid — you aren’t the only one.

I am not afraid of your anger because
however angry you are, you aren’t as angry as me.
And anyway, it’s not your fault-
it just hurts me to see you suffer.

Anger and fear dance a strange waltz,
round and round they go to music we cannot hear;
but don’t be afraid — you aren’t the only one.

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13 Replies to “Anger and Fear”

  1. Brilliant! The very best definition of anger. The terrible duo of anger and fear have produced the worst possible outcomes. But many times we do not see the linkage between them – the cause and affect.

  2. Thank you Clanmother, the linkage came from a bizarre dream I had of two Siamese cats entangled with the other. neither willing to let go, and both wanting to devour the other, locked into a futile battle, for some kind of dominance. I’m no Jungian analyst but I suspect themes of powerlessness underpins many people’s sense of anger and fear. It does mine.

  3. Interesting dream!! I agree – absolutely. Your post reminded me of Charles Dickens in A Christmas Carol. He used a dual analogy as well. Fear is born of ignorance.

    “They are Man’s and they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance and this girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased.”

    The good new is that we have the potential to “erase” anger and fear. An excellent post, as always…

  4. Ah Dicken’s!! one of my favourite Victorian writers, had a true grasp on the human condition.
    It’s true, ignorance can breed fear and other times they seem to be mutually dependent…some fear seems inescapable and sometimes powerlessness leads to an further immobilisation, but the moment we ask ourselves, what am I really afraid of? Once we name that ‘thing’, write about it or paint it, by turning it into a different waltz, the fear seems to move, becoming less insurmountable, more hopeful.
    Having said all that, I’ve never climbed a mountain like the Rocky Mountains before :)

  5. That’s true, anger is a difficult emotion for many, for it takes us out of ourselves before we come to back to our senses and let the possibility of healing begin.

  6. I also agree with Thich Nat Hanh when he talks about struggling with our anger and creating a battlefield in the mind, ‘if you struggle in that way, you do violence to yourself. If you cannot be compassionate to yourself, you will not be able to be compassionate to others ie “you are not alone”. When we get angry we have to produce awareness: ‘I am anger. Anger is in me. I am anger’
    The problem as I see it is not to use the gentle and loving words of Thich Nat Hanh to beat ourselves up further and harder… any spiritual instruction can be converted into a rod with which we beat ourselves harder rather than use as an awakening stick.

  7. This is powerful and subtle at once. The fact that anger is born of fear is often overlooked as we are consumed by our expression of anger and its aftermath. And the stream of conversation – most interesting, and valuable. Thank you for this great post – and so gentle in tone. :)

  8. Anger can be a difficult subject to write about. I certainly struggle with it especially when involving the matter of cancer. I think it better to say it openly and let it go, rather than hold onto the feeling of powerlessness that illness can open up in any one of us.

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