For Love

In Java people speak of water
from the moon
a metaphor for dreaming
of things most deeply to be wished,
but unattainable.

Like hurt ones everywhere
they see life as a tale
of lost illusions,
of youth and beauty burnt out too soon.

And so it seems to me,
that innocence and happiness has faded,
ephemeral as a summer afternoon,

except you have brought me water
from the moon.

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13 Replies to “For Love”

  1. Oh, this is very beautiful, and sad. But then our most beautiful thoughts are sad. I read it again and again. The moon symbolises love in all cultures – there is something about the moon, that inspires lovers everywhere.

  2. Its funny how some ideas transcend countries and cultures across the world, maybe we share a common evocation to a sense of wonder, of impossibility and longing. Sadness found in beauty is something that makes us human, don’t you think?

  3. … and the beauty in sadness? I believe that in life, we are passersby… taking in the sights along the way. The temporary nature of things, including love, passion, youth give us the ability to enjoy it all while it lasts. Memory of it after it is gone gives us sadness… and a joy too, that is deep… deeper than the happiness we felt when we had it all. Love at 16 is a heady feeling… remembering it decades later is immeasurably sweeter… I think we also understand, later in life, that love is intrinsically sad. The sadness of love is its real essence perhaps.
    I used to read a lot of Pearl S. Buck. Peony, Good Earth etc. Her work has this silent enduring quality of describing the passing nature of love, and its changing faces with age.

  4. Gosh thanks for the recommend, I’ve not read any of Pearl’s work before. I will check her out. Most of the poetry I’ve read regarding the bitter-sweet sadness of love, from a woman’s perspective has been from writers like Sylvia Plath (just noticed your new posting), Velma Pollard, and Caroline Griffen, a wonderful feminist poet who I’ve only just discovered. Do you know of her?

  5. I also witness the sadness of love alone in nature, when I walk for miles and mile up mountain crags, its as though I’m searching for natures way, or as the Navajo Indians call, the Beauty Way, It’s a pervasive feeling of connecting with an old friend,

  6. Sorry I missed this comment and question. I used to paint many years ago… tribal motifs on walls and things around the house… not on canvas or paper like a trained painter.
    Indian tribal painting is amazing in its variety and ethos. Different parts of the country have different styles of tribal art. It has significance in religious and social ways and I like it for its aesthetics and earthy nature. It also exudes a powerful sense of freedom, as well as a sense of connectedness with forces of nature.

    The name ‘Laughing Penguins’ is from a poem I wrote to a close friend who lives in cooler climes… that the ‘penguins will laugh at me…’ It became a kind of joke between us… the laughing penguins…. and when I set up the blog, I could think of no other name…. :)

  7. Aha, ;) I had a hunch you were , I mean are, a painter. Indian tribal murals is intriguing, I’m trying to think back and I don’t believe I’ve seen any over here in the UK.
    I agree Art can exude a powerful sense of freedom, as well as a sense of connectedness with forces of nature. Perhaps this a useful way to define art.

    The story behind the name is is fascinating too, and its funny how some phrases stays with us long after they are expressed. Penguins are very intelligent too, we have much to learn from them. I was watching the BBC The Cold Planet where followed the pregnant mothers across the snow, they walks for months to give birth and then they go without food to ensure the young eats and survives the delicate months ahead. In many cases the mother pays for her sacrifice with life.

    Sorry I digress, but its such a beautiful world. I was reflecting on what you wrote about animals yesterday. Anyway thanks for that :)

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